Women’s Health

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Women’s Health

Women's Health SummaryBreast CancerCervical CancerColorectal CancerGo Red for WomenShow Me Healthy WomenStrokeTests AvailableWISEWOMANWomen's Health Day

The Women’s Health Department offers testing and counseling for:

Cholesterol Screening          Blood Sugar Testing          Blood Pressure Monitoring

Pregnancy Testing                 Well Women Exams           Breast Cancer Screening

Pregnancy Referral                                                          Cervical Cancer Screening

Temporary MO Health Net Card (must qualify)

Healthy Heart?
Ladies.  Take the healthy heart challenge!
Click the Go Red icon for more information about your heart’s health.

Are you ready to go RED for a Healthy Heart? 

To view information concerning a healthy heart, prevention of
heart disease, and heart disease risk factors,
click the CDC logo

Know the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack!

Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — the “movie heart attack,” where no one doubts what’s happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren’t sure what’s wrong and wait too long before getting help.

Heart Attack Warning Signs . . .

  • Chest discomfort.Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body.Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness

(source: American Heart Association)

Know the Warning Signs of a Stroke!
  • Stroke Warning Signs . . .
    • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or legs; especially on one side of your body.
    • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
    • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
    • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
    • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause 
  • Diabetes and Intimacy
    Article by: Gwen Stewart, LCSW
    Diabetes and Intimacy: The Guide to Reclaiming Your Love Life

Breast Cancer

Cancer has affected many of our lives.  Each year, more than 211,000 American women and 1,700 men learn they have breast cancer.  Cancer begins in cells, the building blocks that make up tissues in our body.  Tissues make up the organs of the body. When cells grow normal they divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them to and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass of tissue called a growth or tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant.

Benign tumors are tumors that lack all three of the malignant properties of cancer. A benign tumor does not grow in an unlimited, aggressive manner, it does not invade surrounding tissues, and does not metastasize. Common examples of benign tumors include moles and uterine fibroids.

Malignant tumors start from cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that may grow into ( or invade) surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. The disease occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get it, too.

The best method to detect breast cancer is by getting a yearly mammogram.  A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast. This procedure if done annually helps detect breast cancer early before it begins to feel or cause symptoms.  Having a yearly mammogram can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. If you are age 40 years or older, be sure to have a screening mammogram every 1 to 2 years. Talk to your doctor if you have any breast symptoms or changes in your breast, or if breast cancer runs in your family. He or she may recommend that you have mammograms before age 40 or more often than usual.

Breast Cancer News

The news for breast cancer is encouraging:  
   Breast cancer incidence rates were stable from 2001-2003. Reports suggest this could be an end to the increase in incidence that started in the 1980s. It’s too early to tell if this is a trend, and it will be a few years before the data reporting is complete.
   Death from breast cancer from 1995 to 2003 declined in Latinas, white and black women.
   Breast cancer death rates were stable in Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native women.
As reported, breast cancer incidence is influenced by many factors including obesity and the use of mammography screening. Reports have suggested that the breast cancer incidence rate could be related to the rapid removal of hormone replacement therapy from widespread use, a known risk factor for breast cancer.
   Areas of concern for Latinos
For the Latino population, the report highlighted areas of concern including the facts that:
   From 1999 through 2003, the report shows that while Latinos had a lower rate of most cancers than non-Hispanic whites, they were less likely to be diagnosed at an early stage for cancers such as lung, prostate, and female breast.
   Increasing county poverty was associated with more advanced breast cancer stages at the time of diagnosis. The county poverty rate was noted to be an indicator of availability and access to health care.
   Health disparities in the Latino and Non-Hispanic White populations have increased.

National Cancer Institute

Center for Disease Control

Susan G. Komen

Code Pink – The Breast Advice


National Breast Cancer Awarenes -Click logo for info
Or call SFCHC at (573)431-1947

Help Susan G. Komen make it happen, click here
                                    

– Click the links below for additional information –

 Susan G. Komen ForThe Cure

 American Cancer Society

 Breast Cancer Awareness.com

 Code Pink – The Breast Advice

 MO Department of Health & Senior Services

                             Or call SFCHC at (573)431-1947

 

Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates have decreased markedly in the past several decades, with most of the reduction attributed to the introduction of the Pap test. Screening by means of the Pap tests offers a powerful method for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. The use of the Pap test on a regular basis reduces the risk of death from cervical cancer by 90 percent, mainly through the detection and treatment of pre-invasive lesions.

Cervical cancer risk is closely linked to sexual behavior and to sexually transmitted infections with certain types of human papilloma virus (HPV), a virus that can promote the development of cancer. Other risks associated with cervical cancer include having sex at an early age (before age 18), having many sexual partners, or having partners who have had many sexual partners. Committed use of condoms may provide some protection from HPV if a woman falls into one of the three risk categories above. In addition, cigarette smoking increases cervical cancer risk, especially in conjunction with the use of oral contraceptives.

Join America in preventing Cervical Cancer and get regular pap screenings.

For additional information about Cervical Cancer, visit these sites:

Missouri Department of Helath & Senior Servicec – click here

National Cancer Institute – click here

American Cancer Society – click here

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum.
Sometimes it is called colon cancer, for short.

Diagram below illistrates the colon and rectum and
locations where
cancer occurs

SFCHC has applied for “permission to use” this diagram from the Mayo Foundation
Should permission to use not be granted, this diagram will be removed from our website.

•Both men and women can get colorectal cancer.
•Colorectal cancer is most often found in people 50 yrs of age or older.
•The risk for getting colorectal cancer increases with age.

It’s the Second Leading Cancer Killer

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer in the United States, but it doesn’t have to be.  If everybody age 50 or older had regular screening tests, at least one-third of deaths from this cancer could be avoided.
So, if you are 50 yrs old or older, start screening now! Call your doctor . . . make that appointment today!


For more information on Colorectal Cancer
click on the Screen for Life logo at the bottom of this page

Go Red for Women

Are you ready to go RED for a Healthy Heart?  

About The Movement

  
Go Red For Women celebrates the energy, passion and power we have as women to band together to wipe out heart disease and stroke.

Heart disease can affect women of any age.

That’s why it’s so important to start heart-healthy habits right now.

Better U Program

 
Welcome to the Free Makeover that could change your life.
Improve your overall health in just 12 weeks.

  Take the Heart Check-up  It’s free.

Know The Warning Signs of A Heart Attack!

Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — the “movie heart attack,” where no one doubts what’s happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren’t sure what’s wrong and wait too long before getting help.

Heart Attack Warning Signs . . .

  • Chest discomfort.Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body.Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness

(source: American Heart Association)

Stroke

A stroke is considered to be the #3 killer of women, it is a type of vascular disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. A stroke occurs when an artery that carries blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain either bursts or is blocked by a clot. When that happens, part of the brain can’t get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it starts to die.

When part of the brain dies from lack of blood flow, the part of the body it controls is affected. Strokes can cause paralysis, affect language and vision, and cause other problems. Seeking early treatment can minimize the potentially devastating effects of stroke, but to receive them, a person must recognize the warning signs and act quickly.

There are a number of risk factors such as age, family history and race which you cannot control.  That’s why it’s  so important to understand all of your risk factors, discuss them with your healthcare professional and address the risk factors that you can control or that you may be able to treat.

Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Most heart and blood vessel problems develop over time and occur when your arteries develop atherosclerosis, a process that begins in childhood and involves a gradual buildup of plaque inside your arteries.

Plaque contains fat, cholesterol and other substances, and can grow large enough to significantly reduce blood flow through an artery. Most of the damage occurs when the plaque becomes fragile and ruptures.

Plaques that rupture can cause blood clots to form. These clots can block blood flow at the site of the rupture or can break off and travel through the artery to another part of the body. If either happens and blocks an artery that feeds the heart or brain, it causes a heart attack or stroke.

Here are some risk factors that you may control or treat with help from your healthcare professional that may help prevent heart disease and strokes by lifestyle changes.

  Cholesterol           Blood Pressure            Smoking             Physical Activity

  Obesity                    Diabetes                   Birth Control Pills

  Stress                       Alcohol & Illegal Drugs

For more information concerning women and a healthy heart, contact
St. Francois County Health Center at 431-1947

 

Show Me Healthy Women

Click the “Healthy Women” logo and join the thousands of women who feel good about themselves as they learn to make better health choices and get regular exams!

Women who qualify for the “Show Me Healthy Women” program may receive free exams and tests.

Pelvic Exams        Clinical Breast Exams        Blood Pressure
Pap Test               Diabetes Test                   Cholesterol Test
Mammograms/diagnostic services                   Body mass index
Diagnostic services for breast or cervical screenings that are
suspicious for cancer

Call today to see if you qualify for Show Me Healthy Women
St. Francois County Health Center
573-431-1947● Ext. 107   Monday – Friday ● 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Additional information can be found here

The WISEWOMAN program not only deals with tests and diagnostics, but focuses on Lifestyle education; smoking, low physical activity, low consumption of fruits & vegetable, high saturated fat intake and other components of living a healthy lifestyle.

Stroke – #3 Killer of Women

A stroke is considered to be the #3 killer of women, it is a type of vascular disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. A stroke occurs when an artery that carries blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain either bursts or is blocked by a clot. When that happens, part of the brain can’t get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it starts to die.

When part of the brain dies from lack of blood flow, the part of the body it controls is affected. Strokes can cause paralysis, affect language and vision, and cause other problems. Seeking early treatment can minimize the potentially devastating effects of stroke, but to receive them, a person must recognize the warning signs and act quickly.

There are a number of risk factors such as age, family history and race which you cannot control. That’s why it’s so important to understand all of your risk factors, discuss them with your healthcare professional and address the risk factors that you can control or that you may be able to treat.

So What is a Stroke?
A stroke is a type of cardiovascular (heart) disease.   Stroke occurs whenever a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, a part or parts of the brain cannot get blood to nourish brain tissue.  If the brain tissues do not get enough blood, they do not get enough oxygen, so the brain tissue starts to die.

What are the types of stroke?
Basically, there are two types of stroke.  A stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain.

What are the effects of a stroke?
The brain is an extremely complex organ.  The brain controls various body functions.  If a stroke occurs and blood flow can’t reach the region which controls a particular body function, that part of the body won’t work or it malfunctions.

Signs of a Stroke . . .

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

Tests Available

Cholesterol Screening/Bood Sugar Tests:  Fridays, 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM


 Blood Sugar Testing  –  Cost is $10.00
  Lipids Panel includes [Triglycerides, LDL, HDL, Total Cholesterol]  –  Cost is $20.00

A fasting period of 12 hours is required prior to cholesterol screening.

Pregnancy testing – Cost is $10.00

Pregnancy Tests: Monday, 8:00 AM – 12:00 am
Tuesday through Friday, 8:00 AM – 3:30 PM

All pregnancy test are Confidential

Medicaid/Mohealth Net is also accepted

There are a variety of tests available through the
“Show Me Healthy Women” program and the “WISEWOMAN” program.

Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation [WISEWOMAN]

WISEWOMAN is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) program that provides prevention services for women to help them reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke.

The WISEWOMAN program not only deals with tests and diagnostics, but focuses on Lifestyle Education; smoking, low physical activity, low consumption of fruits & vegetable, high saturated fat intake and other components of living a healthy lifestyle.

Through the “Show Me Healthy Women” breast and cervical cancer control project, the WISEWOMAN program provides access to health screenings and lifestyle education for low-income Missouri women.

WISEWOMAN Overview

Vision                    A world where any woman can access preventive health services and gain the wisdom to improve her health.

Mission          To provide low-income, under-insured or uninsured 40-60 year old women with the knowledge, skills, and opportunities to improve diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle behaviors to prevent, delay and control cardiovascular and other chronic diseases.

Why is WISEWOMAN Important

According to the American Heart Association*

More than 50% of deaths caused by cardiovascular disease occurs in woman
Heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular diseases are the NO.1 killer of American females.
 Heart disease, alone, is the NO.1 killer
 ●Stroke is the NO. 3 killer

Nearly 500,000 American females die each year from cardiovascular diseases. That is higher than the next 6 causes of female deaths combined.

Addressing risk factors such as elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking greatly reduces women’s risk and death from heart disease and stroke.

In 2003, coronary heart disease claimed the lives of 233,866 women, compared to 41,566 lives from breast cancer and 67,894 lives from lung cancer.

One in five women has some form of heart disease or vascular disease.

How doe WISEWOMAN Work

WISEWOMAN program is administered through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) program that provides chronic disease risk factor screening, lifestyle intervention, and referral services for women, ages 40 and 64 years, to help them reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke.

Through the “Show Me Healthy Women” breast and cervical cancer control project, the WISEWOMAN program provides access to health screenings and lifestyle education for low-income Missouri women.

The WISEWOMAN program not only deals with tests and diagnostics, but focuses on Lifestyle Education; smoking, low physical activity, low consumption of fruits & vegetable, high saturated fat intake and other components of living a healthy lifestyle.

 

Show Me Healthy Women Screenings

Cardiovascular screenings measure blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose, waist circumference, and body mass index.  Screening measures follow established national guidelines and standards of care.

Show Me Healthy Women Lifestyle Education

Lifestyle education focuses on changing lifestyle behaviors that increase the risk for developing heart disease.  Targeted habits include:

Low physical activity                                                        High saturated fat intake

Low consumption of fruits and vegetables                      Smoking

WISEWOMAN Components

Lifestyle education is tailored for each individual using either individual or group sessions. The education manual, Choices for Healthy Living, was developed specifically for women and includes adaptations for the Midwest culture.

WISEWOMAN Cardiovascular

Healthy Heart? Yes. . . No . . . Don’t Know!
Cardiovascular Health Services can help.

The WISEWOMAN program provides access to free health screenings and lifestyle education services for low-income Missouri women to help reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke.

Free exams and services are provided to women who qualify through the WISEWOMAN program.

To qualify for WISEWOMAN services, women must first receive services from the “Show Me  Healthy Women” program (breast and cervical cancer control project) and be 40 years of age or older.

– Call the St.Francois County Health Center at 573-431-1947 for details –

Log-on to WISEWOMEN 

Contacts:    Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services @
Center for Disease Control (CDC)

St.Francois County Health Center                                @ 573.431.1947 ext 107
American Heart Association

National Women’s Health Week is a week long event and is observed and coordinated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health. It is designed to bring together communities, businesses, government, health organizations, and other groups to promote women’s health and its importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  It is designed to help women make their health a priority and to improve their physical and mental health to lower their health risks.

During Women’s Health Week you are invited to join St. Francois County Health Center in recognizing the importance of staying healthy.

 Check back for future updates for 2016 Women’s Health

FREE FREE FREE

Blood Pressure
Height/Weight
Body Mass Index (BMI)
Lab work will also be offered
NO DOCTOR’S ORDER REQUIRED ON THIS DAY ONLY
CMP-Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
Albumin, Alkaline, Phosphatase, Aspartate Aminotransferase, Alkaline Aminotransferase, Bilirubin, Glucose, Urea Nitrogen, Creatinine, Sodium, Potassium, Chloride, Carbon Dioxide, Calcium, Protein
Lip Profile
(Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL, Cholesterol/HDL,LDL (calculated), LDL/HDL, Phenotype
Cost is $10 for CMP and Lipids

Questions about this event may be directed at
(573)431-1947 ext 107

 For additional information on Womens Health